20 Skills Developed Through Suzuki ECE

20 Skills Developed through Suzuki ECE

The longer I teach Suzuki ECE classes the more amazed I am by all that children ages 0-3 (and their parents) are learning from week to week.

There are so many amazing moments of seeing a children grasp a new concepts during each class!  Below are some of the most striking examples of skills children are developing in SECE classes. You can read them below and also I’ve made a word art printable of them that you can get by email HERE.

 

The ability to keep a steady beat

Pre-Literacy Skills

Counting

Social Skills

Ability to focus & concentrate

Musical Timing

Turn taking

Pitch

Awareness of the musical scale

Creativity

Interacting and cooperating with a teacher

Bonding with parent/Caregiver through working together in class

Sharing with classmates

Sensitivity

Beginning Group/ensemble skills

Vocabulary & language skills

Confidence

Singing on pitch

Crossing the mid-line of the body

Fine motor control

Suzuki ECE

Special Note:

Sometimes people think that all ECE classes are the same. After teaching others I disagree . . . you can read my article about what makes Suzuki ECE unique HERE.

I think that others have the perception that  SECE classes are just a lot of singing and tapping a steady beat, and wonder if teacher training is needed to really teach the class well.

As Suzuki instrumental teachers we tend to bristle when people say they are Suzuki teachers and also: “I use the books but have never taken any training.” If this is you, please don’t be offended, but it’s just that Suzuki teacher training is about so so much more than the music in the books.

In the same way, SECE is so much more than a list of activities done in class each week. Trained SECE teachers use these activities in a complex way that weaves together their in-depth knowledge of: child development, musical development, parent education strategies, and activities to develop social-linguistic skills.

To watch a class in action is wonderful and as someone who had a degree in Early Childhood Education, and years of teaching experience (both instrumental and in other ECE music programs) when I watched my first SECE class,  I knew right away that this class had something way beyond what I had seen or experienced before in classes like it.

I can’t recommend getting training enough. And, if you’re a parent I can’t recommend finding and joining a Suzuki ECE class enough if there is one in your area.

I’d love to hear in the comments what you would add to my list of skills above and if you’d like to download a printable PDF of the word art used in this post you can do so here:

Why You Should Replace the To Do List

To Be List

If you’re like me you have a big to do list.

Being a Suzuki Parent can feel like it’s own big to do list. . . 

Attend Lessons
Take notes
Ask the right questions
Attend Group Classes & recitals
Make sure your child has all the materials & equipment they need
Make sure to listen every day
Practice on the days that you eat!

The list could go on and on and I’m sure you understand how important it is. 

I even wrote a whole book on the habits of successful Suzuki families. There are certainly many important things to do.

BUT

As a Suzuki teacher, parent, and former Suzuki kid, I understand both the importance of doing things well and also keeping things into perspective.

There are days where all of things we need to do seems like too much. When you wonder if it’s worth it or if you’re doing the right thing . . .  I challenge you to replace that to do list you have completely and think of who we’re striving to be instead . . .

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“Having more things to do than time is stressful

Having the chance to develop into who we want to be is inspiring”

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People who stay inspired stay motivated.
They don’t give up because they’re exhausted by the process.
They are excited to see where they are headed next.
Can we all agree we need more of that in our lives? Our Musical lives and beyond?
It’s true for me at least!

So let’s strive to: 

Be present
Be a family that listens to beautiful music
Be a part of the community around you
Be daily practicers
Be our child’s biggest fan
 .  .   .
As a teacher, I am passionate about the idea that if we focus on what we want to be: as a family, a parent (a teacher, or a student) then we can create an environment that helps students thrive.
Having a lot to do is stressful –  having the chance to develop into who we want to be is inspiring! Join me in replacing the To Do list.

What would you add to your To Be List? 

My 2016 Favorites

I love looking back at the end of the year to reflect on what my year was like and how I want to approach the new year. I thought as part of that process this year I would share my favorite things of 2016 related to teaching. I hope you will share your your favorites in the comments.

Suzuki Experience – Written by Suzuki parent Alan Duncan, this is a great blog about Suzuki from the parent perspective. I find myself sharing posts from this blog with the parents in my studio all the time.

The Plucky Violin Teacher This blog is a fantastic resource for parents and teachers alike. Written by Suzuki violin teacher Brecklyn Ferrin this blog has great ideas and resources about teaching and practicing. I highly recommend it. Breckyn’s blog was one of the first Suzuki blogs I started following regularly and is a big inspiration to me.

Teach Suzuki is written by Suzuki teacher Paula Bird, who also created the Teach Suzuki Podcast which can be found HERE on itunes. I started reading Paula’s blog a number of years ago and have found great information on it about teaching, running my studio, and even making goals for the new year. I had the pleasure of meeting Paula in person this year as she visited Oregon which was very fun!

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